stestr user manual

Usage

A parallel Python test runner built around subunit

stestr
    [--version]
    [-v | -q]
    [--log-file LOG_FILE]
    [--debug]
    [--user-config USER_CONFIG]
    [-d HERE]
    [--config CONFIG]
    [--repo-type {file,sql}]
    [--repo-url REPO_URL]
    [--test-path TEST_PATH]
    [--top-dir TOP_DIR]
    [--group-regex GROUP_REGEX]
    [--parallel-class]
--version

show program’s version number and exit

-v, --verbose

Increase verbosity of output. Can be repeated.

-q, --quiet

Suppress output except warnings and errors.

--log-file <LOG_FILE>

Specify a file to log output. Disabled by default.

--debug

Show tracebacks on errors.

--user-config <USER_CONFIG>

An optional path to a default user config file if one is not specified ~/.stestr.yaml and ~/.config/stestr.yaml will be tried in that order

-d <HERE>, --here <HERE>

Set the directory or url that a command should run from. This affects all default path lookups but does not affect paths supplied to the command.

--config <CONFIG>, -c <CONFIG>

Set a stestr config file to use with this command. If one isn’t specified then .stestr.conf in the directory that a command is running from is used

--repo-type <REPO_TYPE>, -r <REPO_TYPE>

Select the repo backend to use

--repo-url <REPO_URL>, -u <REPO_URL>

Set the repo url to use. An acceptable value for this depends on the repository type used.

--test-path <TEST_PATH>, -t <TEST_PATH>

Set the test path to use for unittest discovery. If both this and the corresponding config file option are set, this value will be used.

--top-dir <TOP_DIR>

Set the top dir to use for unittest discovery. If both this and the corresponding config file option are set, this value will be used.

--group-regex <GROUP_REGEX>, --group_regex <GROUP_REGEX>, -g <GROUP_REGEX>

Set a group regex to use for grouping tests together in the stestr scheduler. If both this and the corresponding config file option are set this value will be used.

--parallel-class, -p

Set the flag to group tests by class. NOTE: This flag takes priority over the –group-regex option even if it’s set.

failing

Show the current failures known by the repository.

Without –subunit, the process exit code will be non-zero if the previous test run was not successful and test failures are shown. But, with –subunit, the process exit code is non-zero only if the subunit stream could not be generated successfully from any failures. The test results and run status are included in the subunit stream emitted for the failed tests, so the stream should be used for interpretting the failing tests. If no subunit stream is emitted with –subunit and a zero exit code then there were no failures in the most recent run in the repository.

stestr failing [--subunit] [--list]
--subunit

Show output as a subunit stream.

--list

Show only a list of failing tests.

This command is provided by the stestr plugin.

init

Create a new repository.

stestr init

This command is provided by the stestr plugin.

last

Show the last run loaded into a repository.

Failing tests are shown on the console and a summary of the run is printed at the end.

Without –subunit, the process exit code will be non-zero if the test run was not successful. With –subunit, the process exit code is non-zero only if the subunit stream could not be generated successfully. The test results and run status are included in the subunit stream, so the stream should be used to determining the result of the run instead of the exit code when using the –subunit flag.

stestr last
    [--subunit]
    [--no-subunit-trace]
    [--force-subunit-trace]
    [--color]
    [--suppress-attachments]
    [--all-attachments]
--subunit

Show output as a subunit stream.

--no-subunit-trace

Disable output with the subunit-trace output filter

--force-subunit-trace

Force subunit-trace output regardless of anyother options or config settings

--color

Enable color output in the subunit-trace output, if subunit-trace output is enabled. (this is the default). If subunit-trace is disable this does nothing.

--suppress-attachments

If set do not print stdout or stderr attachment contents on a successful test execution

--all-attachments

If set print all text attachment contents on a successful test execution

This command is provided by the stestr plugin.

list

List the tests for a project.

You can use a filter just like with the run command to see exactly what tests match.

stestr list
    [--blacklist-file BLACKLIST_FILE]
    [--whitelist-file WHITELIST_FILE]
    [--black-regex BLACK_REGEX]
    [filters [filters ...]]
--blacklist-file <BLACKLIST_FILE>, -b <BLACKLIST_FILE>

Path to a blacklist file, this file contains a separate regex exclude on each newline

--whitelist-file <WHITELIST_FILE>, -w <WHITELIST_FILE>

Path to a whitelist file, this file contains a separate regex on each newline.

--black-regex <BLACK_REGEX>, -B <BLACK_REGEX>

Test rejection regex. If a test cases name matches on re.search() operation , it will be removed from the final test list. Effectively the black-regexp is added to black regexp list, but you do need to edit a file. The black filtering happens after the initial white selection, which by default is everything.

filters

A list of string regex filters to initially apply on the test list. Tests that match any of the regexes will be used. (assuming any other filtering specified also uses it)

This command is provided by the stestr plugin.

load

Load a subunit stream into a repository.

Failing tests are shown on the console and a summary of the stream is printed at the end.

Without –subunit, the process exit code will be non-zero if the test run was not successful. With –subunit, the process exit code is non-zero if the subunit stream could not be generated successfully. The test results and run status are included in the subunit stream, so the stream should be used to determining the result of the run instead of the exit code when using the –subunit flag.

stestr load
    [--partial]
    [--force-init]
    [--subunit]
    [--id ID]
    [--subunit-trace]
    [--color]
    [--abbreviate]
    [--suppress-attachments]
    [--all-attachments]
    [files [files ...]]
--partial

DEPRECATED: The stream being loaded was a partial run. This option is deprecated and no does anything. It will be removed in the future

--force-init

Initialise the repository if it does not exist already

--subunit

Display results in subunit format.

--id <ID>, -i <ID>

Append the stream into an existing entry in the repository

--subunit-trace

Display the loaded stream through the subunit-trace output filter

--color

Enable color output in the subunit-trace output, if subunit-trace output is enabled. If subunit-trace is disable this does nothing.

--abbreviate

Print one character status for each test

--suppress-attachments

If set do not print stdout or stderr attachment contents on a successful test execution

--all-attachments

If set print all text attachment contents on a successful test execution

files

The subunit v2 stream files to load into the repository

This command is provided by the stestr plugin.

run

Run the tests for a project and store them into the repository.

Without –subunit, the process exit code will be non-zero if the test run was not successful. However, with –subunit, the process exit code is non-zero only if the subunit stream could not be generated successfully. The test results and run status are included in the subunit stream, so the stream should be used to determining the result of the run instead of the exit code when using the –subunit flag.

stestr run
    [--failing]
    [--serial]
    [--concurrency CONCURRENCY]
    [--load-list LOAD_LIST]
    [--partial]
    [--subunit]
    [--until-failure]
    [--analyze-isolation]
    [--isolated]
    [--worker-file WORKER_PATH]
    [--blacklist-file BLACKLIST_FILE]
    [--whitelist-file WHITELIST_FILE]
    [--black-regex BLACK_REGEX]
    [--no-discover TEST_ID]
    [--random]
    [--combine]
    [--no-subunit-trace]
    [--force-subunit-trace]
    [--color]
    [--slowest]
    [--abbreviate]
    [--suppress-attachments]
    [--all-attachments]
    [filters [filters ...]]
--failing

Run only tests known to be failing.

--serial

Run tests in a serial process.

--concurrency <CONCURRENCY>

How many processes to use. The default (0) autodetects your CPU count.

--load-list <LOAD_LIST>

Only run tests listed in the named file.

--partial

DEPRECATED: Only some tests will be run. Implied by –failing. This option is deprecated and no longer does anything. It will be removed in the future

--subunit

Display results in subunit format.

--until-failure

Repeat the run again and again until failure occurs.

--analyze-isolation

Search the last test run for 2-test test isolation interactions.

--isolated

Run each test id in a separate test runner.

--worker-file <WORKER_PATH>

Optional path of a manual worker grouping file to use for the run

--blacklist-file <BLACKLIST_FILE>, -b <BLACKLIST_FILE>

Path to a blacklist file, this file contains a separate regex exclude on each newline

--whitelist-file <WHITELIST_FILE>, -w <WHITELIST_FILE>

Path to a whitelist file, this file contains a separate regex on each newline.

--black-regex <BLACK_REGEX>, -B <BLACK_REGEX>

Test rejection regex. If a test cases name matches on re.search() operation , it will be removed from the final test list. Effectively the black-regexp is added to black regexp list, but you do need to edit a file. The black filtering happens after the initial white selection, which by default is everything.

--no-discover TEST_ID, -n TEST_ID

Takes in a single test to bypasses test discover and just execute the test specified. A file may be used in place of a test name.

--random, -r

Randomize the test order after they are partitioned into separate workers

--combine

Combine the results from the test run with the last run in the repository

--no-subunit-trace

Disable the default subunit-trace output filter

--force-subunit-trace

Force subunit-trace output regardless of anyother options or config settings

--color

Enable color output in the subunit-trace output, if subunit-trace output is enabled. (this is the default). If subunit-trace is disable this does nothing.

--slowest

After the test run, print the slowest tests.

--abbreviate

Print one character status for each test

--suppress-attachments

If set do not print stdout or stderr attachment contents on a successful test execution

--all-attachments

If set print all text attachment contents on a successful test execution

filters

A list of string regex filters to initially apply on the test list. Tests that match any of the regexes will be used. (assuming any other filtering specified also uses it)

This command is provided by the stestr plugin.

slowest

Show the slowest tests from the last test run.

This command shows a table, with the longest running tests at the top.

stestr slowest [--all]
--all

Show timing for all tests.

This command is provided by the stestr plugin.

Overview

stestr is an application for running and tracking test results. Any test run that can be represented as a subunit stream can be inserted into a repository. However, the test running mechanism assumes python is being used. It is originally forked from the testrepository project so the usage is similar.

A typical basic example workflow is:

# Create a store to manage test results in.
$ stestr init
# Do a test run
$ stestr run

Most commands in testr have comprehensive online help, and the commands:

$ stestr --help
$ stestr [command] --help

Will be useful to explore the system.

Configuration

To configure stestr for a project you can write a stestr configuration file. This lets you set basic information about how tests are run for a project. By default the config file needs to be .stestr.conf in the same directory that stestr is run from, normally the root of a project’s repository. However, the --config/-c CLI argument can specify an alternate path for it.

The 2 most important options in the stestr config file are test_path and top_dir. These 2 options are used to set the unittest discovery options for stestr. (test_path is the same as --start-directory and top_dir is the same as --top-level-directory in the doc) Only test_path is a required field in the config file, if top_dir is not specified it defaults to ./. It’s also worth noting that shell variables for these 2 config options (and only these 2 options) are expanded on platforms that have a shell. This enables you to have conditional discovery paths based on your environment.

For example, having a config file like:

[DEFAULT]
test_path=${TEST_PATH:-./foo/tests}

will let you override the discovery start path using the TEST_PATH environment variable.

A full example config file is:

[DEFAULT]
test_path=./project/tests
top_dir=./
group_regex=([^\.]*\.)*

The group_regex option is used to specify is used to provide a scheduler hint for how tests should be divided between test runners. See the Grouping Tests section for more information on how this works. You can also specify the parallel_class=True instead of group_regex to group tests in the stestr scheduler together by class. Since this is a common use case this enables that without needing to memorize the complicated regex for group_regex to do this.

There is also an option to specify all the options in the config file via the CLI. This way you can run stestr directly without having to write a config file and manually specify the test_path like above with the --test-path/-t CLI argument.

Running tests

To run tests the stestr run command is used. By default this will run all tests discovered using the discovery parameters in the stestr config file.

If you’d like to avoid the overhead of test discovery and just manually execute a single test (test class, or module) you can do this using the --no-discover/-n option. For example:

$ stestr run --no-discover project.tests.test_foo.TestFoo

you can also give it a file path and stestr will convert that to the proper python path under the covers. (assuming your project don’t manually mess with import paths) For example:

$ stestr run --no-discover project/tests/test_foo.py

will also bypass discovery and directly call the test runner on the module specified.

Additionally you can specify a specific class or method within that file using :: to specify a class and method. For example:

$ stestr run --no-discover project/tests/test_foo.py::TestFoo::test_method

will skip discovery and directly call the test runner on the test method in the specified test class.

Test Selection

Arguments passed to stestr run are used to filter test ids that will be run. stestr will perform unittest discovery to get a list of all test ids and then apply each argument as a regex filter. Tests that match any of the given filters will be run. For example, if you called stestr run foo bar this will only run the tests that have a regex match with foo or a regex match with bar.

stestr allows you do to do simple test exclusion via passing a rejection/black regexp:

$ stestr run --black-regex 'slow_tests|bad_tests'

stestr also allow you to combine these arguments:

$ stestr run --black-regex 'slow_tests|bad_tests' ui\.interface

Here first we selected all tests which matches to ui\.interface, then we are dropping all test which matches slow_tests|bad_tests from the final list.

stestr also allows you to specify a blacklist file to define a set of regexes to exclude. You can specify a blacklist file with the --blacklist-file/-b option, for example:

$ stestr run --blacklist-file $path_to_file

The format for the file is line separated regex, with # used to signify the start of a comment on a line. For example:

# Blacklist File
^regex1 # Excludes these tests
.*regex2 # exclude those tests

The regexp used in the blacklist file or passed as argument, will be used to drop tests from the initial selection list. It will generate a list which will exclude any tests matching ^regex1 or .*regex2. If a blacklist file is used in conjunction with the normal filters then the regex filters passed in as an argument regex will be used for the initial test selection, and the exclusion regexes from the blacklist file on top of that.

The dual of the blacklist file is the whitelist file which will include any tests matching the regexes in the file. You can specify the path to the file with --whitelist-file/-w, for example:

$ stestr run --whitelist-file $path_to_file

The format for the file is more or less identical to the blacklist file:

# Whitelist File
^regex1 # Include these tests
.*regex2 # include those tests

However, instead of excluding the matches it will include them.

It’s also worth noting that you can use the test list option to dry run any selection arguments you are using. You just need to use stestr list with your selection options to do this, for example:

$ stestr list 'regex3.*' --blacklist-file blacklist.txt

This will list all the tests which will be run by stestr using that combination of arguments.

Adjusting test run output

By default the stestr run command uses an output filter called subunit-trace. (as does the stestr last command) This displays the tests as they are finished executing, as well as their worker and status. It also prints aggregate numbers about the run at the end. You can read more about subunit-trace in the module doc: Subunit Trace.

However, the test run output is configurable, you can disable this output with the --no-subunit-trace flag which will be completely silent except for any failures it encounters. There is also the --color flag which will enable colorization with subunit-trace output. If you prefer to deal with the raw subunit yourself and run your own output rendering or filtering you can use the --subunit flag to output the result stream as raw subunit v2.

There is also an --abbreviate flag available, when this is used a single character is printed for each test as it is executed. A . is printed for a successful test, a F for a failed test, and a S for a skipped test.

In the default subunit-trace output any captured output to stdout and stderr is printed after test execution, for both successful and failed tests. However, in some cases printing these attachments on a successful tests is not the preferred behavior. You can use the --suppress-attachments flag to disable printing stdout or stderr attachments for successful tests.

While by default attachments for captured stdout and stderr are printed, it is also possible that a test has other text attachments (a common example is python logging) which are not printed on successful test execution, only on failures. If you would like to have these attachments also printed for successful tests you can use the --all-attachments flag to print all text attachments on both successful and failed tests. Both --all-attachments and --suppress-attachments can not be set at the same time. If both are set in the user config file then the suppress-attachments flag will take priority and no attachments will be printed for successful tests. If either --suppress-attachments or --all-attachments is set via the CLI it will take precedence over matching options set in the user config file.

Combining Test Results

There is sometimes a use case for running a single test suite split between multiple invocations of the stestr run command. For example, running a subset of tests with a different concurrency. In these cases you can use the --combine flag on stestr run. When this flag is specified stestr will append the subunit stream from the test run into the most recent entry in the repository.

Alternatively, you can manually load the test results from a subunit stream into an existing test result in the repository using the --id/-i flag on the stestr load command. This will append the results from the input subunit stream to the specified id.

Running previously failed tests

stestr run also enables you to run just the tests that failed in the previous run. To do this you can use the --failing argument.

A common workflow using this is:

  1. Run tests (and some fail):

    $ stestr run
    
  2. Fix currently broken tests - repeat until there are no failures:

    $ stestr run --failing
    
  3. Do a full run to find anything that regressed during the reduction process:

    $ stestr run
    

Another common use case is repeating a failure that occurred on a remote machine (e.g. during a jenkins test run). There are a few common ways to do approach this.

Firstly, if you have a subunit stream from the run you can just load it:

$ stestr load < failing-stream

and then run the tests which failed from that loaded run:

$ stestr run --failing

If using a file type repository (which is the default) the streams generated by test runs are in the repository path, which defaults to .stestr/ in the working directory, and stores the stream in a file named for their run id - e.g. .stestr/0 is the first run.

Note

For right now these files are stored in the subunit v1 format, but all of the stestr commands, including load, only work with the subunit v2 format. This can be converted using the subunit-1to2 tool in the python-subunit package.

If you have access to the remote machine you can also get the subunit stream by running:

$ stestr last --subunit > failing-stream

This is often a bit easier than trying to manually pull the stream file out of the .stestr directory. (also it will be in the subunit v2 format already)

If you do not have a stream or access to the machine you may be able to use a list file. If you can get a file that contains one test id per line, you can run the named tests like this:

$ stestr run --load-list FILENAME

This can also be useful when dealing with sporadically failing tests, or tests that only fail in combination with some other test - you can bisect the tests that were run to get smaller and smaller (or larger and larger) test subsets until the error is pinpointed.

stestr run --until-failure will run your test suite again and again and again stopping only when interrupted or a failure occurs. This is useful for repeating timing-related test failures.

Listing tests

To see a list of tests found by stestr you can use the stestr list command. This will list all tests found by discovery.

You can also use this to see what tests will be run by a given stestr run command. For instance, the tests that stestr run myfilter will run are shown by stestr list myfilter. As with the run command, arguments to list are used to regex filter the tests.

Parallel testing

stestr lets you run tests in parallel by default. So, it actually does this by def:

$ stestr run

This will first list the tests, partition the tests into one partition per CPU on the machine, and then invoke multiple test runners at the same time, with each test runner getting one partition. Currently the partitioning algorithm is simple round-robin for tests that stestr has not seen run before, and equal-time buckets for tests that stestr has seen run.

To determine how many CPUs are present in the machine, stestr will use the multiprocessing Python module On operating systems where this is not implemented, or if you need to control the number of workers that are used, the --concurrency option will let you do so:

$ stestr run --concurrency=2

When running tests in parallel, stestr adds a tag for each test to the subunit stream to show which worker executed that test. The tags are of the form worker-%d and are usually used to reproduce test isolation failures, where knowing exactly what test ran on a given worker is important. The %d that is substituted in is the partition number of tests from the test run - all tests in a single run with the same worker-N ran in the same test runner instance.

To find out which slave a failing test ran on just look at the ‘tags’ line in its test error:

======================================================================
label: testrepository.tests.ui.TestDemo.test_methodname
tags: foo worker-0
----------------------------------------------------------------------
error text

And then find tests with that tag:

$ stestr last --subunit | subunit-filter -s --xfail --with-tag=worker-3 | subunit-ls > slave-3.list

Grouping Tests

In certain scenarios you may want to group tests of a certain type together so that they will be run by the same worker process. The group_regex option in the stestr config file permits this. When set, tests are grouped by the entire matching portion of the regex. The match must begin at the start of the string. Tests with no match are not grouped.

For example, setting the following option in the stestr config file will group tests in the same class together (the last ‘.’ splits the class and test method):

group_regex=([^\.]+\.)+

However, because grouping tests at the class level is a common use case there is also a config option, parallel_class, to do this. For example, you can use:

parallel_class=True

and it will group tests in the same class together.

Note

This parallel_class option takes priority over the group_regex option. And if both on the CLI and in the config are set, we use the option on the CLI not in a config file. For example, --group-regex on the CLI and parallel-class in a config file are set, --group-regex is higer priority than parallel-class in this case.

Test Scheduling

By default stestr schedules the tests by first checking if there is any historical timing data on any tests. It then sorts the tests by that timing data loops over the tests in order and adds one to each worker that it will launch. For tests without timing data, the same is done, except the tests are in alphabetical order instead of based on timing data. If a group regex is used the same algorithm is used with groups instead of individual tests.

However there are options to adjust how stestr will schedule tests. The primary option to do this is to manually schedule all the tests run. To do this use the --worker-file option for stestr run. This takes a path to a yaml file that instructs stestr how to run tests. It is formatted as a list of dicts with a single element each with a list describing the tests to run on each worker. For example:

- worker:
  - regex 1

- worker:
  - regex 2
  - regex 3

would create 2 workers. The first would run all tests that match regex 1, and the second would run all tests that match regex 2 or regex 3. In addition if you need to mix manual scheduling and the standard scheduling mechanisms you can accomplish this with the concurrency field on a worker in the yaml. For example, building on the previous example:

- worker:
  - regex 1

- worker:
  - regex 2
  - regex 3

- worker:
  - regex 4
  concurrency: 3

In this case the tests that match regex 4 will be run against 3 workers and the tests will be partitioned across those workers with the normal scheduler. This includes respecting the other scheduler options, like group_regex or --random.

There is also an option on stestr run, --random/-r to randomize the order of tests as they are passed to the workers. This is useful in certain use cases, especially when you want to test isolation between test cases.

User Config Files

If you prefer to have a different default output or setting for a particular command stestr enables you to write a user config file to overide the defaults for some options on some commands. By default stestr will look for this config file in ~/.stestr.yaml and ~/.config/stestr.yaml in that order. You can also specify the path to a config file with the --user-config parameter.

The config file is a yaml file that has a top level key for the command and then a sub key for each option. For an example, a fully populated config file that changes the default on all available options in the config file is:

run:
  concurrency: 42 # This can be any integer value >= 0
  random: True
  no-subunit-trace: True
  color: True
  abbreviate: True
  slowest: True
  suppress-attachments: True
  all-attachments: True
failing:
  list: True
last:
  no-subunit-trace: True
  color: True
  suppress-attachments: True
  all-attachments: True
load:
  force-init: True
  subunit-trace: True
  color: True
  abbreviate: True
  suppress-attachments: True
  all-attachments: True

If you choose to use a user config file you can specify any subset of the options and commands you choose.

Automated test isolation bisection

As mentioned above, its possible to manually analyze test isolation issues by interrogating the repository for which tests ran on which worker, and then creating a list file with those tests, re-running only half of them, checking the error still happens, rinse and repeat.

However that is tedious. stestr can perform this analysis for you:

$ stestr run --analyze-isolation

will perform that analysis for you. The process is:

  1. The last run in the repository is used as a basis for analysing against - tests are only cross checked against tests run in the same worker in that run. This means that failures accrued from several different runs would not be processed with the right basis tests - you should do a full test run to seed your repository. This can be local, or just stestr load a full run from your Jenkins or other remote run environment.
  2. Each test that is currently listed as a failure is run in a test process given just that id to run.
  3. Tests that fail are excluded from analysis - they are broken on their own.
  4. The remaining failures are then individually analysed one by one.
  5. For each failing, it gets run in one work along with the first 1/2 of the tests that were previously run prior to it.
  6. If the test now passes, that set of prior tests are discarded, and the other half of the tests is promoted to be the full list. If the test fails then other other half of the tests are discarded and the current set promoted.
  7. Go back to running the failing test along with 1/2 of the current list of priors unless the list only has 1 test in it. If the failing test still failed with that test, we have found the isolation issue. If it did not then either the isolation issue is racy, or it is a 3-or-more test isolation issue. Neither of those cases are automated today.

Forcing isolation

Sometimes it is useful to force a separate test runner instance for each test executed. The --isolated flag will cause stestr to execute a separate runner per test:

$ stestr run --isolated

In this mode stestr first determines tests to run (either automatically listed, using the failing set, or a user supplied load-list), and then spawns one test runner per test it runs. To avoid cross-test-runner interactions concurrency is disabled in this mode. --analyze-isolation supersedes --isolated if they are both supplied.

Repositories

stestr uses a data repository to keep track of test previous test runs. There are different backend types that each offer different advantages. There are currently 2 repository types to choose from, file and sql.

You can choose which repository type you want with the --repo-type/-r cli flag. file is the current default.

You can also specify an alternative repository with the --repo-url/-u cli flags. The default value for a file repository type is to use the directory: $CWD/.stestr. For a sql repository type is to use a sqlite database located at: $CWD/.stestr.sqlite.

Note

Make sure you put these flags before the cli subcommand

Note

Different repository types that use local storage will conflict with each other in the same directory. If you initialize one repository type and then try to use another in the same directory, it will not work.

File

The default stestr repository type has a very simple disk structure. It contains the following files:

  • format: This file identifies the precise layout of the repository, in case future changes are needed.
  • next-stream: This file contains the serial number to be used when adding another stream to the repository.
  • failing: This file is a stream containing just the known failing tests. It is updated whenever a new stream is added to the repository, so that it only references known failing tests.
  • #N - all the streams inserted in the repository are given a serial number.

SQL

This is an experimental repository backend, that is based on the subunit2sql library. It’s currently still under development and should be considered experimental for the time being. Eventually it’ll replace the File repository type

Note

The sql repository type requirements are not installed by default. They are listed under the ‘sql’ setuptools extras. You can install them with pip by running: pip install 'stestr[sql]'